Life as an Extreme Sport

The Daily – Toward Insuring Immigrants

Toward insuring immigrants 2006-05-01 The older Asian woman tugs insistently at the young blonde doctor’s coat, pulling her out into the pouring rain, talking in a foreign tongue. The doctor, a new intern, is confused but following. What she finds shocks her: a young woman by the dumpster, face lacerated and in need of stitches. The intern tries to convince the young woman to come inside, but in broken English she refuses. She’s afraid. She’s an illegal, as is her mother. There was an accident in the factory, could she please be stitched up? Time slows and the intern faces her options. Just as fast, time snaps back into place and the intern slowly moves around the hospital, gathering the supplies she’ll need to stitch the laceration in the parking lot. She gets the young woman, now her patient, to promise she’ll come back to have the stitches removed. The

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The Daily – Pharmacists’ moral acumen

Pharmacists’ moral acumen 2006-04-24 One of the more interesting and underrepresented facts about many women’s health providers — places that are routinely targeted because they provide low- or no-cost birth control for women, as well as access to abortions — is that they often offer other health services, such as flu shots and general health exams. Sometimes, antibiotics are prescribed. Most of these clinics don’t have on-site pharmacies, so it is up to the patient to go elsewhere to have the prescription filled. Or, as was the case with a patient from the Cedar Rivers Clinic, which has facilities in Renton, Tacoma and Yakima, Wash., the prescription is called into a pharmacy for pickup. Unfortunately, in May 2005, a pharmacist at the Swedish Medical Center outpatient pharmacy took it upon him or herself to decide it was morally unacceptable to receive antibiotics from a clinic that provides access to birth

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The Daily: Finding Saviour in a Sibling

Finding a savior in a sibling Publish Date: 2006-04-17 This at last is bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh. The paper reads, “‘Designer Baby’ clinic to charge ?6,000 a child.” That’s a lot of money, even for an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) kid. The second sentence in the article explains, in a simple phrase, why: Savior siblings. Savior siblings are not a new concept, and parents have been creating them for years. Parents of sick children will, after all, go to great lengths to help their child, and savior siblings are children born in the hope that they will be genetic matches for a sick relative. This option took on new life in 2000, when Adam Nash was born. The Nash’s had a little girl with a disease that causes leukemia, and often death at a young age. Doctors theorized that cord blood from a donor would extend

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Shay Saves the Day

I took Shay’s advice, after pounding my head against my thesis so long I swear I’ve a large purple bruise on my forhead. I collected together all my writing in one document, in roughly the order I thought it should all go in. I then expanded around each section, explaining what else I thought needed to go in around these fuller paragraphs. Suddenly, I have 20 pages of thesis. Which is between 1/3-1/5th of the way done with the project, and 20 pages more than I had yesterday. More importantly, by far more importantly, I actually feel, now, like this is something I can do.

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Autopoiesis in Action

I had one of the most amazing experiences in class today. It was the first truly “Thurtle” lecture, and towards the end of the class we started talking about what happens to our body when we go on the internet, where do “we” exist, and so forth. If you’re not taking the class or part of the Thurtle ducklings, it’s understandable if you just scratch your head and say “bwuh?” Anyhow, I offered to the class that the internet itself is a body that we inscribe meaning upon, just as meaning it inscribed upon us – by other people, and by the internet. That it is an organized body as much as we are. And as I started saying this (admittedly more elegantly than this), Phillip’s lips twitched up and he got this most amazingly satisfied smile – you see, this was one of the first arguments he and I

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